The cytokine release syndrome (CRS), also called the cytokine storm, is one of the most serious syndromes associated with COVID-19. The CRS occurs when the immune system becomes over-stimulated, potentially resulting in increased alveolar-capillary blood-gas exchange dysfunction, leading to pulmonary fibrosis and, ultimately death[1]. In patients with COVID-19, high plasma levels of cytokines, including IL-2, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, G-CSF, IP10, MCP1, […]

The cytokine release syndrome (CRS), also called the cytokine storm, is one of the most serious syndromes associated with COVID-19. The CRS occurs when the immune system becomes over-stimulated, potentially resulting in increased alveolar-capillary blood-gas exchange dysfunction, leading to pulmonary fibrosis and, ultimately death[1]. In patients with COVID-19, high plasma levels of cytokines, including IL-2, IL-6, IL-7, IL-10, G-CSF, IP10, MCP1, MIP1A and TNF-a appear to be indicative of the CRS. For patients infected with COVID-19, the CRS is directly related to disease severity and prognosis. Furthermore, analysis of immune characteristics of patients with COVID-19 shows that IL-6 and GM-CSF are two key cytokines leading to the CRS.

Ergomed COVID-19 Whitepaper_ The Role of IL-6 Blockers in the Treatment of Patients

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